Toxic threats

The chemicals used in everything from perfumes to cleaners to fertilizers should make our lives better — not harm our health or our environment.

There are more than 80,000 chemicals on the market in the United States, used in everything from perfumes and household cleaners to fertilizers and industrial solvents. Surprisingly, most chemicals go into use without testing their long-term impact on our health or the environment. We should make sure that any chemical in use is safe, eliminate any we know are dangerous, and when industries make a toxic mess, we should know right away, and they should pay to clean it up.

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Campaign for Columbia Sportswear Commitment to Eliminate PFAS Launched Today

Toxic threats

Campaign for Columbia Sportswear Commitment to Eliminate PFAS Launched Today

Today U.S. PIRG Education Fund and NRDC launched a campaign to urge Columbia Sportswear to eliminate toxic PFAS in their products and supply chain by 2024. The campaign will engage everyday consumers through a petition drive and mobilize the public impacted by PFAS contamination.

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Statement: Johnson & Johnson recalls sunscreen products after tests detect carcinogens

Consumer alerts

Statement: Johnson & Johnson recalls sunscreen products after tests detect carcinogens

Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. said Wednesday it’s voluntarily recalling all lots of five types of Neutrogena and Aveeno aerosol sunscreen after internal testing showed “low levels of benzene” -- which can cause cancer -- in some samples. J&J also said consumers should stop using the sunscreen.

Media Statements  

Statement: Johnson & Johnson recalls sunscreen products after tests detect carcinogens

Consumer alerts

Statement: Johnson & Johnson recalls sunscreen products after tests detect carcinogens

Johnson & Johnson Consumer Inc. said Wednesday it’s voluntarily recalling all lots of five types of Neutrogena and Aveeno aerosol sunscreen after internal testing showed “low levels of benzene” -- which can cause cancer -- in some samples. J&J also said consumers should stop using the sunscreen.

Media Statements  

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