Right to repair

We should be able to fix our stuff when it breaks. That means getting the companies who make our stuff, to give us the right to repair our stuff.

We should be able to fix our stuff when it breaks. We need easy access to the information, tools, resources and third party repair shops it takes to fix our cell phones, appliances, electronics and other equipment. That means working together to get the companies who make our stuff, to give us the right to repair our stuff. When they do, it will be better for the planet, better for our budgets, and things will work the way they are supposed to.

The Latest on Right to repair
Why it’s hard to repair our stuff and how that could change in Illinois
Farmers increasingly can't repair farm equipment without going back to their dealer

Right to repair

Why it’s hard to repair our stuff and how that could change in Illinois

My mom, a tailor and small business owner, fixes clothes so that it doesn’t need to be thrown away. This is possible because the tools for clothing repair are available to anyone and  there is little that clothing manufacturers can do to prevent independent repairs. Anybody with the will has the option to repair their clothes or to hire a tailor. This is not true in industries like consumer electronics, farm equipment, and life-saving medical devices. Customers are withheld the option to repair the things they own because the equipment is intentionally designed to be impossible to repair. 

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The Latest
‘Failing the Fix’ scorecard grades Apple, Google, Dell, others on how fixable their devices are

Right to repair

‘Failing the Fix’ scorecard grades Apple, Google, Dell, others on how fixable their devices are

Consumers often don’t know which products will last and they’ll be able to fix, or which manufacturers make fixable devices and support Right to Repair. A new scorecard by Illinois PIRG Education Fund, “Failing the Fix,” ranks the most popular cell phone and laptop makers for consumers who seek to purchase easily repairable products – especially those from companies who do not fight to prevent Right to Repair.

Media Releases  

‘Hog-tied’ and fed up: New report shows dealership consolidation makes farmers’ lives harder

Right to repair

‘Hog-tied’ and fed up: New report shows dealership consolidation makes farmers’ lives harder

Many farm equipment manufacturers prevent farmers from accessing the software tools they need to fix their modern tractors. That forces farmers to turn to corporate-authorized dealers for many problems, which can lead to high repair bills and delays that can put their crops—and their livelihoods—at risk. While farmers have always relied on local dealerships for help, more and more those dealerships have been bought up by large chain networks, further reducing competition and exacerbating the problems farmers already face due to repair restrictions.

Media Releases  

New Report Shows What Illinoisans Tried to Fix in 2020, and the Barriers They Still Face

Right to repair

New Report Shows What Illinoisans Tried to Fix in 2020, and the Barriers They Still Face

Illinois PIRG released a new report Friday, “What are Illinoisans Fixing?” which compiles data from the popular repair instruction website iFixit.com about what items people in Illinois were fixing the most in 2020. The report also takes a closer look at the broader repair ecosystem, including barriers that make it harder than it should be to perform basic repairs and how the COVID-19 pandemic affected the things we were fixing. 

Media Releases  

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